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Interfering With the Reporting of Domestic Violence: What You Need to Know

interfering with the reporting of domestic violence in chicago, skokie, rolling meadows

Did you know that you could be charged with a crime if you interfere when someone is attempting to report domestic battery or aggravated domestic battery?

It happens more often than you think.

Interfering With the Reporting of Domestic Violence

Under Illinois law, it’s illegal for a person to interfere with the reporting of domestic violence.

The law says:

A person commits interfering with the reporting of domestic violence when, after having committed an act of domestic violence, he or she knowingly prevents or attempts to prevent the victim of or a witness to the act of domestic violence from calling a 9-1-1 emergency telephone system, obtaining medical assistance, or making a report to any law enforcement official.

So what does that mean?

If you’ve committed domestic battery or aggravated domestic battery and then attempt to prevent the victim from calling emergency responders or from receiving medical help, and the prosecution can prove that you’re guilty of either (or both) of those things, you could be convicted.

You could also be convicted if you prevent the victim from making a police report (or any type of report to a law enforcement professional).

Penalties for Interfering With the Reporting of Domestic Violence

If the court finds you guilty of interfering with the reporting of domestic violence, that’s a Class A misdemeanor — and it’s punishable by up to a year in jail, up to two years of probation, and a fine of up to $2,500.

The state of Illinois takes domestic violence charges, and reporting of domestic violence incidents, very seriously.

Do You Need a Lawyer After Being Accused of Interfering With Domestic Violence Reporting?

Whether you’re innocent or guilty, if someone has accused you of interfering with domestic violence reporting in any way, you may find it helpful to talk to a Chicago domestic violence defense lawyer.

Your lawyer will explain the possible penalties, examine the evidence that the prosecution has against you, and build a strategy that gets you the best possible outcome.

Call us immediately at 847-920-4540 for a free domestic violence defense case review. We’ll talk about your options and give you case-specific, actionable legal advice.

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